On Locked Doors: John 20.19, 26

I have been at a Conference of Uniting Church Theological Educators all week and had to prepare a very short sermon for the final Eucharist. I took the Gospel reading for the coming Sunday, John 20.19-31 (Easter 2). While my research was minimal, I did notice one thing that caught my eye. In the NRSV the two main scenes in this section are introduced in the following way:

John 20.19   When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.”

John 20.26  A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.”

The point is that the Greek term for locked/shut is the same in each case.

καὶ τῶν θυρῶν κεκλεισμένων (v19)

τῶν θυρῶν κεκλεισμένων (v26)

Why the NRSV chooses to render the 2nd version 'shut' I have no idea. I managed to get a brilliant sermon point out of this little Greek observation, but I am not going to tell you what it was.